VJ3! Finally done. This piece covers the controversy of caffeine found in alcoholic beverages and the FDA’s response and actions taken. I will post more when I am done traveling later!

Newsweek and Daily Beast

In a recent New York Times article, David Carr comments on the combining of Newsweek and the Daily Beast, and says the two properties that have almost nothing in common other than the fact that they both lose lots of money. I found it amusing,  but more importantly an interesting nuptial for a online-only news site. 

Nature montage

More digital books! This is the Kno and it seems spectacular, but I still don’t think I can get used to not holding a collection of papers and such. (This article introduced it in June.) It is an e-reader and a tablet - so sort of like the iPad meets the Kindle, and its relatively inexpensive for something of the sort. 
Regardless, the Kno comes from the same guy that started up Chegg, the text book renting service. He is looking out for us college folk! So all in all, while the world is becoming so digital… I am wondering if we are keeping up? Or falling behind? Are be succumbing to purchasing these products, or are we sticking to our tangible, heavy text books?

More digital books! This is the Kno and it seems spectacular, but I still don’t think I can get used to not holding a collection of papers and such. (This article introduced it in June.) It is an e-reader and a tablet - so sort of like the iPad meets the Kindle, and its relatively inexpensive for something of the sort. 

Regardless, the Kno comes from the same guy that started up Chegg, the text book renting service. He is looking out for us college folk! So all in all, while the world is becoming so digital… I am wondering if we are keeping up? Or falling behind? Are be succumbing to purchasing these products, or are we sticking to our tangible, heavy text books?

Photo Gallery Assignment; Our Cancer Year.

The event itself was the speech given by Brabner and Stack but there was also a photo gallery in Stewart Center (disclaimer: I was NOT able to go inside the gallery to take photos due to copyrights).

I spent last Thursday evening in Stewart Center shooting students and residents coming to hear the speakers, as well as the outside of the gallery where people browsed through to look at the images from the graphic novel, “Our Cancer Year”, which details the late Harvey Pekar’s battle with lymphoma. I took photos inside the Eliza Fowler Hall, as well to give a better sense of where the event took place and tried to get reactions from attendees, but a lot of people actually fell asleep and didn’t find it as interesting as I. 

Midterm Elections

Though I mostly find myself getting news from print on most occasions (the Expo, JandC), there is only so much you can get out of one newspaper. So I browse the internet, and my favorite midterm election site ended up being CNN. But as the member of a very conservative household I always tend to read from both sides and from there draw upon my own conclusions. This year CNN had frequent updates, and kept me in the loop as much as I needed to be.

One of those other sites I used during this year’s elections was the Drudge Report (my dad had made this my homepage a while back).  Although very conservative and not like my normal CNN, Drudge’s entire page is full of links to other sites giving updates from sites like Fox News and The Washington Times. These link to election results, what I spend most of my time paying attention to.

Of course to tie into the course, another way I tracked the election was by The Daily Beast, one of the online-only newspapers we are looking at for our case study in group two. On the Cheat Sheet tonight there is an an article that mentions that the Senate races in Alaska and Washington are still undecided, and that there is a net loss in the total number of women in Congress this year, for the first time in thirty years! That just shows me that The Daily Beast is bringing up other relevant news that maybe not all sites cover. So altogether, I think I have some pretty superb ways to get my election coverage efficiently and quickly.

Headcount

One way I have been keeping up with the Midterm Elections is through Headcount. They register voters at concerts and make civic participation part of the live music experience. Bands have helped Headcount register over 160,000 voters by welcoming them at their concerts, pointing to their tables from stage and appearing in public service announcement campaigns.

This is how I registered to vote at a festival in New York in 2008 and think it is simply great that musicians and their fans believe they can be leaders of the worldwide social movement. 

One of the tabs is called issues and has links to websites regarding these issues. One issue is farm and food policy and to follow is a list of links that are credible, professional sources like such:

  • FarmFoody.org– A social network connecting individuals to farms and gardens.
  • FoodPolitics.com – A popular blog maintained by a New York University professor.
  • NinaPlankc.com – News updated by a best-selling author.
  • AgriFeeds.org – Aggregated news and events on agriculture.
  • Ers.USDA.gov/publications – The Economic Research Service is a primary source of economic information and research in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ERS conducts a research program to inform public and private decision making on economic and policy issues involving food, farming, natural resources and rural development.

I went to vote yesterday while I was home (in South Bend) at the City Building.

Thoughts on VJ2

My second VJ piece went a lot smoother- I decided to use a different camera, with no tape so uploading and importing went 100% smoother than with the first piece (in Hicks).  Also, I did a voice over - which I ended up loving; one reason being the fact that you just get to hear yourself talk, and another  because it made my piece flow so much better than the Purdue Rifle and Pistol Club piece. 

One issue I ran into was combining both pieces of audio. The audio from my interviews, which was recorded in the video itself, couldn’t be added because I couldn’t have both- it seemed like I had to choose one or the other throughout the whole piece, something I will work on for the next VJ piece. 

The topic I chose was perfect for the season, and the idea of ritual, and loved trying out all the aspects of video journalism and what I have been learning so far, and will continue to learn. I have to say that all the hands on, in depth work that we have been doing is AWESOME and a great learning experience thus far. 

This is my second video journalism piece on the ritual of pumpkin carving during the autumn season, where it came from, and how people partake in rituals today. 

I used the Flip camera to create my video, Garageband for my voice over (which I learned to love during the podcast project) and put my video together to be short and sweet and to the point. 

Newspaper: falling circulation - though the rate of decline has slowed (and for some increased)

Figures released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations showed that overall weekday circulation at 635 newspapers declined 5 percent from circulation in the same six months last year. The decline last year was at more than twice that rate, which is good ‘news’ for now!

And! actually the newspaper reporting the highest weekday circulation was The Wall Street Journal at just over 2 million, though that number includes 450,000 electronic subscriptions. The number of individually paid printed copies the journal distributes each weekday averaged 1.4 million. Over all, The Journal’s circulation was up almost 2 percent — one of only two major newspapers to report an increase. The other was The Dallas Morning News, randomly. 

This article can be found from the NYTimes